The value of providing value

You don't have to earn an M.B.A  to provide value. In fact, you have to get a college degree to provide value.

Instead, it's turning the ship of your mindset to navigate it on the course of producing value. A genuine and sincere path to help other people based on their circumstances. When I was calling owners of construction companies or talking to directors in IT, it always consisted of providing value.

That's where my skills on communicating came into play especially when I had only a few seconds to establish rapport.

Did it mean that I was out to persuade that person on the other line? Yes, but not entirely. Persuasion isn't the best word to describe it. There's a subtle implication that it creates. It points to trying to convince a person that I provided the best solution I represented.

Cold calling isn't about convincing people and duping them into a meeting that potentially may not relevant to them.  It is to present value by articulating the values of the service. It's listening and asking the best questions to uncover if there's a need for the service.

Questions are like keys. If you ask the right question, you unlock new information. Information that you listen to, so you can show the value and help someone out.

I met a man recently who said something very profound. He said,

GOOD SALESPEOPLE MAKE GREAT STATEMENTS, BUT GREAT SALESPEOPLE ASK GOOD QUESTIONS.

I could not agree with him more, and I’m thankful to have heard that simple proverb.

To wrap this up, providing value comes out of the desire of helping people. It’s selfless, truthful, and genuine. They will appreciate not being fooled and resonate with that. They will tell their colleagues and friends in the industry about an amazing service experience from a stranger. It'll spread like wild-fire, and you'll start having people wanting to learn more about your business.